Jackie Robinson

 

Other Trading Cards

ARCHIMEDES

ARISTOTLE

Johann Sebastian BACH

Ludwig van Beethoven

Alexander Graham BELL

Nellie Bly

BUDDHA

Julius Caesar

Jesus Christ

Christopher Columbus

Confucius

MARIE CURIE

LEONARDO DA VINCI

Charles DARWIN

Thomas EDISON

Albert EINSTEIN

EUCLID

Henry FORD

Sigmund Freud

Galileo

Mohandas Gandhi

Adolf HITLER

CHIEF JOSEPH

GENGHIS KHAN

Martin Luther KING Jr.

Martin Luther

Michelangelo

Muhammad

NAPOLEON

SIR ISAAC NEWTON

Louis PASTEUR

PLATO

EDGAR ALLEN POE

Jackie Robinson

William Shakespeare

Joseph Stalin

Mother Teresa

Ts'ai Lun

Harriet Tubman

George Washington

 

 

 

Jan 31, 1919 – Oct 24, 1972

Professional Baseball Player, Businessman, Civil Rights Spokesman

American

“He was the black knight, and he checkmated bigotry.” -- Reverend Jesse Jackson

“A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives.”

Jackie Robinson’s first game in the majors was memorable. In five at bats, he hit three singles and one three-run home run, stole two bases and scored four times (two by forcing the pitcher to balk).

Jack Roosevelt Robinson, also known as Jackie, was the first African American to play on a major league team. In the machines, his athletic abilities were showcased in many sports (baseball, basketball, track-and-field, football, etc.). He was sought after by coaches. Even though the pay was small and the conditions were harsh, he began major league play for the Negro League. General manager for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Branch Rickey, soon noticed Jackie’s talents. With civil rights laws, Rickey knew segregation in major league baseball would soon end. He decided to use Jackie as a trial for integration. Jackie was under intense pressure to prove himself worthy, as the future of other black athletes depended upon his success. He was also asked to take a vow of silence for his feelings about his treatment for three years. He received hate mail, death threats, taunting from other players (even from some of his own teammates), but he kept his pledge. He even endured the belittling laws which would not allow him to stay in the same hotels or eat in the same restaurants as the rest of his team. He was able to keep going because of his intense drive to succeed and because of the encouragement he received from Rickey, his family and other black supporters. Jackie went on to help make the Dodgers a winning team, earn the National League’s batting championship, win the Most Valuable Player Award and spur other major league teams on to recruiting other black players. When African Americans were allowed to play in the majors, he aggressively exposed racial prejudice in baseball.