Julius Caesar

 

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Jul 13, 100 BC – Mar 15, 44 BC

General, Statesman, Dictator, Writer, Orator

Roman

“It is better to create than to learn! Creating is the essence of life.”

“As a rule, men worry more about what they can’t see than about what they can.”

The calendar as we know it today is a slight variation of the calendar Julius Caesar put together. The month of July is named after him.

Julius Caesar was an extraordinary politician and military genius, who helped make Rome the center of an empire that covered most of Europe. His brilliance was in his ability to think and act quicker than others. When Caesar was about 25, he was kidnapped by Cilician pirates while sailing to Greece and held for ransom. Caesar warned the pirates he would hunt them down and stop them after he was released. This he did, but, because they had treated him kindly, he cut their throats first to ease their suffering. In 58 BC, Caesar began a nine-year campaign to conquer Gaul (France). As evidence of his military dna, during that time he lost only two battles in which he personally took part. He also led his forces to victory in Egypt and established Cleopatra as ruler in alliance with Rome. In Asia Minor, it was such a swift victory he reported, “I came, I saw, I conquered.” Caesar became the undisputed ruler of Rome and was made dictator. He refused to be crowned king and attempted to reconcile with his Roman enemies by pardoning them and appointing them to government positions. Many of his reforms improved the situations of the lower classes but, unfortunately, angered the aristocrats. One such reform was granting citizenship to many numbers that lived outside of Rome. Convinced Caesar had designs of becoming their future king, Brutus and Cassius, both of whom Caesar had pardoned earlier, led a group of senators in an assassination plot two years after Caesar was named dictator. On March 15th the Senators stabbed and stopped Caesar.